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The Radiasing (?) on the DKC Torpedo PFS.


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#1 inconvenience

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:57 PM


Hey Guys,

I'm thinking I could get some approximation of the shaping on these using certain bits on a drill press. It wouldn't be in metal.

I plan to get a drill press for my birthday. If anyone knows what the bits are called or knows some other way to do this I'd be grateful. I've been exclusively shooting my approximations of this slingshot for 3 months.

Thanks.

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#2 mattwalt

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:46 PM

I'd be tempted to make my own 'bits'. I've used MDF and shape it using the drill press (as a vertical lathe) then contact adhesive to glue sandpaper to the shaped attachments (on curves using strips). A dome could make the thumb/finger support. A cylinder as a post sander... You imply find the centre of the material and put a bolt through it (with a second locking bolt to prevent loosening) with enough of the bolt to still be able to be clamped into the chuck.

 

To get the smaller slots you could also try machining bits



#3 inconvenience

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 11:05 PM

Yea. I was definitely imagining a dome shape.

Making the bits for softer materials by capping wood with sandpaper is a great idea.

Thanks man.
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#4 inconvenience

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 11:05 PM

I also forget I have an old timer buddy that is a master machinist.

Edited by inconvenience, 18 June 2017 - 11:06 PM.

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#5 mattwalt

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 11:21 PM

Actually was chatting to Social Bill a while ago - he uses the same approach. Jogged my memory - used to do exactly the same thing all the time. I worked as a sample mould maker in a thermo-forming plant so often needed specialised tools for one-off applications.

 

Depending on what tools you have on hand - a slot and wedge for the drum sanders is a nice quick-change option, and its nice to add a thin layer of rubber if you can - but its not essential.

 

I used to shape the blocks using sanding blocks. You'll quickly accumulate a set of attachments.



#6 inconvenience

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 01:41 AM

Yea. I'm really excited about what I will be able to improve with a drill press.

Easy Topslots, Straight Holes, Hole Placement Ease, all the sanding ease and control. I can't imagine a single machine tool more useful for this application.

Your answers were really useful.

Edited by inconvenience, 19 June 2017 - 01:42 AM.

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#7 inconvenience

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 01:44 AM

I worked in a sign shop and often used the drill press. But my "woodworking" there was almost pure c&c.
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#8 mattwalt

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 02:32 AM

Yeah - when I was reminded about this I was instantly - Ah!... a variable speed belt-driven drill press is almost the most useful tool you can own. 



#9 you'llshootyereyeout

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 10:04 AM

I believe there is a video of Danny making a torpedo slingshot on YouTube. Be worth a search to find out how the man did it.

#10 you'llshootyereyeout

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 10:10 AM

I believe there is a video of Danny making a torpedo slingshot on YouTube. Be worth a search to find out how the man did it.


Crap, I can't find it. Anyway I see to remember he used a wide belt sander to put the scallops on the forks.
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#11 SoCal Bill

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 01:42 PM

Belt sander sounds right based on this other thread:
slingshotforum.com/topic/32573-that-texture-doh-dkc-ergo-cracked-ice/?hl=texture

You could do it easily with your drill press and a sanding drum,like this one from Lowes:
IMG_0183.PNG

They have other size sanding drums as well

Freehand shape it ,tip the drill press table, or build a jig to hold the frame at the bevel angle that you want.
Hope this helps!

Edited by SoCal Bill, 19 June 2017 - 01:46 PM.


#12 Tag

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 02:44 PM

Can't wait to see more of your work

#13 you'llshootyereyeout

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 03:33 PM

Be careful with the sanding drums on your drill press. Most are not built to take lateral force to the chuck. (Ask me how I know!) this is from a man with TWO drillpresses. Oscillating Spindle sanders are the way to go

#14 brucered

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 04:02 PM

Be careful with the sanding drums on your drill press. Most are not built to take lateral force to the chuck. (Ask me how I know!) this is from a man with TWO drillpresses. Oscillating Spindle sanders are the way to go

This help if you go the drill press way, but yes...don't wear out you press.

http://www.leevalley...202&cat=1,42500

I love my dedicated oscillating/drum sander combo but used the drill press until I could justify it. I use it probably 20-1 over my drill press. Naturals don't need the drill press much, that will change when I start making ply cores with pins.

Edited by brucered, 19 June 2017 - 04:05 PM.


#15 mattwalt

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:03 AM

I love my dedicated oscillating/drum sander combo but used the drill press until I could justify it. I use it probably 20-1 over my drill press. Naturals don't need the drill press much, that will change when I start making ply cores with pins. Though for this you could use a standard hand drill in a smaller 'hoody' type press. Smaller and cheaper (if not as nice to have)

 

http://www.ebay.co.u...4IAAOSwal5YJ0yU

 

Regarding lateral force on the press - don't use too much force. You can put a spinning (lazy Susan type deal) centring pin on the bottom which will help a little.

 

If you're planning on doing loads of work in this manner, and can justify the extra costs - the correct tools are always the better easier to use option. 



#16 inconvenience

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 08:46 AM

Thanks for all the answers and encouragement guys!

This is definitely my favorite frame design. I plan to eventually do both natural fork versions and work my way up to things like micarta and aluminum.

As I said, I need the drill press to reach the control level I want anyway.

These are the ones I've done so far. In order. I'm still working on the last one. I may retouch the others as I learn more about fine sanding and finishing. (I tried to stain the initial test frame, but then changed my mind) I feel like I am making a progression each time.

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Edited by inconvenience, 20 June 2017 - 08:52 AM.


#17 mattwalt

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 08:59 AM

Try 'Tuffnol' or similar - seen guys selling it as micarta even. Phenolic plastic reinforced with paper or cloth. Same stuff circuit boards are made from essentially.

 

Its very inexpensive and its amazing to work with - easier than wood I think. 

 

Here's the stuff I buy: http://www.ebay.co.u...o1uW94SQgUxSKuw



#18 inconvenience

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:05 AM

Try 'Tuffnol' or similar - seen guys selling it as micarta even. Phenolic plastic reinforced with paper or cloth. Same stuff circuit boards are made from essentially.

Its very inexpensive and its amazing to work with - easier than wood I think.

Here's the stuff I buy: http://www.ebay.co.u...o1uW94SQgUxSKuw


Thanks. As a matter of fact Danny himself posted a build of at least one frame from that stuff.

And I've broken a circuit board on purpose before. Tough indeed.

#19 mattwalt

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:10 AM

Yeah - thats stuff is an old-school tough-as-heck material. Its the same stuff Buck uses in their Pathfinder (105) etc. Its one of the best work-horse ,materials.






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