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#1 ryanpaul

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:04 AM


can a router cut a ss out of 1/2" plywood?


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#2 mattwalt

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:26 PM

Yes it can. But more importantly how would you be approaching using a router to cut ply?


Edited by mattwalt, 14 March 2017 - 01:27 PM.


#3 ryanpaul

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 07:37 PM

so i dont need jig or band saw? thge router will do fine?



#4 brucered

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 08:02 PM

You'll need a steady hand or a template, table and flush bit.

I can't see a router working well for free hand cutting of a Ply frame

#5 ryanpaul

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:02 PM

You'll need a steady hand or a template, table and flush bit.

I can't see a router working well for free hand cutting of a Ply frame

what bit would i need to free hand just trace a pattern on n cut it out?



#6 brucered

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:10 PM

To be honest, I can't see it working.

I'd recommend hand cutting with a coping saw if you don't have access to a jigsaw, scroll saw or bandsaw.

You can pick one up at any bigbox hardware store for $12.

Edited by brucered, 14 March 2017 - 09:11 PM.


#7 mattwalt

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 02:15 AM

OK... No.

 

I was going to give a long explanation... but simply its too aggressive and uncontrollable. And potentially dangerous. I've seen it done but on MDF which is grain free - and by someone who was a genius with a router. A router likes going in a certain direction - any other will wander or want to dig in. On something with complex curves thats going to be difficult - then add the possibility of uneven grain (even in ply)... Snap a bit at full tilt and you have a lethal projectile...

 

A router can do the job - but works best with a solid guide. Be that a template or CNC... or fence... 

 

If you are making a one off - like Brucered says coping saw (from around $2) See attached did this with one a swiss army knife (awl) a small round file and sandpaper... If you planing on doing a few make a template. Bill hays has a great video online.

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  • IMG_20170315_081251.jpg


#8 bigdh2000

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 03:56 AM

A router can be used but you need to have one of two machines to do so safely. A CNC, which very few have, or a Pantogragh system which is not to costly. That being said, a decent second hand scroll saw comes at the price of a Pantogragh.



#9 KawKan

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 08:08 AM

so i dont need jig or band saw? thge router will do fine?

Not sure where you're going here. 

 

If you're trying to limit yourself to one power tool, you may get the most bang for the buck from a jig saw with a scrolling blade. 

 

The learning curve is not as steep as a with a router. 

 

A four-in-hand file can easily handle most round-over challenges. 



#10 wn4Studios

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 09:08 AM

Definitely a template and flush trim bit. Don't take too many shortcuts...stay safe.

#11 ryanpaul

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 05:28 PM

Definitely a template and flush trim bit. Don't take too many shortcuts...stay safe.

im

 

 

so i dont need jig or band saw? thge router will do fine?

Not sure where you're going here. 

 

If you're trying to limit yourself to one power tool, you may get the most bang for the buck from a jig saw with a scrolling blade. 

 

The learning curve is not as steep as a with a router. 

 

A four-in-hand file can easily handle most round-over challenges. 

 

im gonna do just that. make a lil table for jig saw, lil file set.



#12 The Gopher

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 09:54 AM

I use a scroll saw to rough out the pattern and then a master template and a flush trim bit with a router table to finish it, followed by a round over bit. As your only tool a router is a poor choice.






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