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Microwave drying natural forks...


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#1 E.G.

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 12:57 PM


Hey folks,

I want to show you my process of microwave drying natural forks.
First I'm going to forest cut some fresh dogwood forks...
I cut two forks, because these forks is for my first test microwave drying.

Dried procedure: 1 minute in the microwave 15, or 20 minutes of cooling.
I weigh fresh fork, then after every minute of drying, and after cooling, it weighing.
On average, must lose minimum 30 to 35% by weight (fresh)...

Okay here is a table of drying:

First fork---> Fresh weight~ 446 gr.

1.after one minute of drying 442 gr.
2.+1 minute       436 gr.
3.+1 minute       429 gr.
4.+1 minute       424 gr.
5.+1 minute       418 gr.
6.+1 minute       412 gr.
7.+1 minute       405 gr.
8.+1 minute       401 gr.
9.+1 minute       393 gr.
10.+1 minute      391 gr.
11.+1 minute      383 gr.
12.+1 minute      372 gr.
13.+1 minute      351 gr.
14.+1 minute      338 gr.
15.+1 minute      325 gr.
16.+1 minute      314 gr.
17.+1 minute      299 gr.
18.+1 minute      294 gr.
19.+1 minute      283 gr.
20.+1 minute      272 gr.
21.+1 minute      262 gr.
22.+1 minute      256 gr.

This is it, anyway I did not have to go that far but everything is fine!
It's lose about 42,5% of fresh weight!

Second fork---> Fresh weight~ 260 gr.

1.after one minute of drying 255 gr.
2.+1 minute       249 gr.
3.+1 minute       243 gr.
4.+1 minute       238 gr.
5.+1 minute       232 gr.
6.+1 minute       227 gr.
7.+1 minute       222 gr.
8.+1 minute       219 gr.
9.+1 minute       214 gr.
10.+1 minute      211 gr.
11.+1 minute      200 gr.
12.+1 minute      192 gr.
13.+1 minute      178 gr.
14.+1 minute      162 gr.
15.+1 minute      150 gr.
16.+1 minute      149 gr.

This is it, anyway I did not have to go that far but i want to try on smaller fork,
and it's not a good idea I burned it !!! :D
But he also lost about 42,5% of fresh weight... :lol:

 

Here are the pictures:
Fotografija0990 - paint.jpg Fotografija0993 - Copy (Large).jpg

 

In few days the smaller will be finished, so stay tuned :)

 

Cheers

E.G.

 



#2 Charles

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 05:31 PM

Very good of you to document these results. I suppose a lot depends on the power of the microwave. I am always afraid of scorching the fork, so I only microwave for 30 seconds at a time. Your technique seems to work very well ... microwave for a short time and then let cool for a long time, then repeat.

Cheers ... Charles

#3 Btoon84

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 07:26 PM

Nice work! Thanks for taking the time to put this together. You're spot on for how you should go about microwaving a fresh fork.

#4 E.G.

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 01:14 AM

Very good of you to document these results. I suppose a lot depends on the power of the microwave. I am always afraid of scorching the fork, so I only microwave for 30 seconds at a time. Your technique seems to work very well ... microwave for a short time and then let cool for a long time, then repeat.

Cheers ... Charles

 

I almost forgot after removing from the microwave  always with a paper towel wipe the water at the ends of the fork, because the forks pulls water back...

Also the cooling is very important if it does not cool enough cracks will occur!

 

Nice work! Thanks for taking the time to put this together. You're spot on for how you should go about microwaving a fresh fork.

 

I'm glad that I can help someone :)



#5 rockchunker

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 09:35 PM

Thanks, I was curious about waving. Great info!

#6 E.G.

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 12:52 AM

Thanks, I was curious about waving. Great info!

You're welcome ;)



#7 The Gopher

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 11:39 AM

Good post, My experience with MW drying was that you need to let it cool MUCH longer than you think, especially after a few cycles and when the moisture content is starting to drop. As there is less water to evaporate the energy is going into the wood and that is when you start to scorch. Also, what might feel cool to the touch is likely still hot on the inside. I started just letting things cool for an hour or more, then I would usually forget and come back to it later, but never had a problem with scorching after much longer cool times.

 

I would recommend still leaving the forks and handle long since there is a good chance that it will still develop checks.

 

Now my only process of cutting natural forks is to cut a lot of them, leave the forks and handle extra long, seal the ends with wood glue, mark them with the date I cut them and come back to the stock pile after a year or so. It takes time to build up a good stock, but now I have a plenty of forks ready to go and new ones always coming in.  



#8 E.G.

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 03:58 PM

Good post, My experience with MW drying was that you need to let it cool MUCH longer than you think, especially after a few cycles and when the moisture content is starting to drop. As there is less water to evaporate the energy is going into the wood and that is when you start to scorch. Also, what might feel cool to the touch is likely still hot on the inside. I started just letting things cool for an hour or more, then I would usually forget and come back to it later, but never had a problem with scorching after much longer cool times.

 

I would recommend still leaving the forks and handle long since there is a good chance that it will still develop checks.

 

Now my only process of cutting natural forks is to cut a lot of them, leave the forks and handle extra long, seal the ends with wood glue, mark them with the date I cut them and come back to the stock pile after a year or so. It takes time to build up a good stock, but now I have a plenty of forks ready to go and new ones always coming in.  

I agree with all that you say ;)

Now with a lot more experience, I do like you do.., a lot of forks are in process of air drying :)

 

Cheers






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