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Beginner Slingshot Builders Kit


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#61 gbeauvin

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 01:29 PM

Neither had I, it caught me completely off guard when I tried to rotate it and it wouldn't go!  I took it apart to see what was wrong, and the blade holder opposite the handle is keyed -- it won't rotate and can only go in one way.  I'll take some pics tonight, but it has a black/yellow handle and is marked "Portland Saw".

 

-GB



#62 gbeauvin

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 12:56 PM

Here is the handle of the saw in question :

1397069576_zps3b20d1f0.jpg

 

Here is the far end (notice there is no lever for rotating it) :

1397069571_zps35aea708.jpg

 

And here it is disassembled.  If you look closely you'll see that the hole is "keyed" such that the endpiece can only fit through one way, and it will certainly not rotate.

1397069591_zpsb6a7a4f0.jpg

 

 

-GB



#63 Underachiever

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 06:34 AM

Very helpful post, thanks very much!



#64 MikmaqWarrior

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 09:22 AM

A friend gave me a huge peice of industrial plastic...it's about 1" thick....would it be suitable as a frame material?
I see videos on youtube of people using conduit pip so I didn't really see a problem with the thick plastic...any thoughts?

#65 ryguy27

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 01:05 AM

An Inch Thick Of Plastic Should Be Fine, If It's HDPE Or PVC It Definitely Will Be. Make Sure To Test It Before You Shoot Though!

#66 TLG_Catapults

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 06:05 PM

I cannot recommend the coping saw that I got from HF... the ones at my local HF (portland saw brand?) do not allow the blade to be rotated!  I'm wishing I had spend the extra $3 to get one at the BORG (Big Orange Retail Giant) instead.  I picked up some of those rasps and a pack of sandpaper (and a couple pair of safety glasses for the kids) the other day though, so as soon as I get a new coping saw I'll be good to go!
 
-GB


Ok look , saw into the wood and turn the whole saw while sawing to make turns .

#67 DogBox

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 11:21 PM

 


Ok look , saw into the wood and turn the whole saw while sawing to make turns .

 

GB, The only good thing about that "Portland" saw is a comfy handle!  And NOT being able to "rotate the Frame" - even whilst sawing, defeats the

whole idea OF a coping saw.

When I was a kid, my aunty gave me a coping saw. I've still got it...over 40 yrs later. The next thing she gave me was a 'hand-drill'. With these two you

can accomplish heaps.

Personally, I love my bench vyse [vise] ! Sheet copper over the jaws stops marks. Leaves 'both' hands to rasp or file [bastard metal files are quite rough]

Great  sticky Hrawk. [Good to see another from Aust.!]

 

DogBox



#68 kwinpr

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 02:56 PM

Seems like a good basic starter kit. Maybe add a larger saw or cutting implement (machete here in PR) for cutting natural tree forks.



#69 THWACK!

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 03:01 PM

I cannot recommend the coping saw that I got from HF... the ones at my local HF (portland saw brand?) do not allow the blade to be rotated!  I'm wishing I had spend the extra $3 to get one at the BORG (Big Orange Retail Giant) instead.  I picked up some of those rasps and a pack of sandpaper (and a couple pair of safety glasses for the kids) the other day though, so as soon as I get a new coping saw I'll be good to go!

 

-GB

...and that's why it's known as "Horror Freight"   :neener:



#70 Jonathan Wong

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Posted 05 December 2014 - 06:30 AM

I used a coping saw before the end result well....... leta just say not so good

#71 namazu

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Posted 21 December 2014 - 10:18 AM

Thanks for the advice getting started ive never looked over the homemade section of this forum the talent and the beity of these homemade franes blow my mind . Make me want to give it a try.

#72 pult421

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 01:37 PM

Blocks n wood dowels for contour sanding? Great job covering basics other wise


Rolled up sandpaper works as well if yall dont wanna waste money on dowels

#73 AUYIJKJU

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Posted 20 November 2015 - 03:06 AM

It is amazing to see how little it takes and how little it costs to get started.

http://www.casesam.c...e-cover-15.html
http://www.casesam.c...e-cover-10.html
http://www.casesam.c...e-cover-33.html



#74 eagle_eye0214

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 12:59 PM

A rotary cutter really is the only way to go. A paper guillotine is also pretty good too.what is the lube used for

Using scissors or a straight blade can cause many problems leading to greatly reduced band life.

If you had no other choice then to use a knife, be sure to have one that's razor sharp and has decent belly on it. Give it a good amount of silicone lube to stop it bunching and stretching the rubber as it cuts.






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