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Which Slingshot Is Most Accurate And Powerful?


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#1 sparrowslinger

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:04 AM


I am choosing one of these "cheap" slingshots from Walmart, which is the most accessible store around my hunting zone. I want to know which one will surely drop a sparrow accurately with a hard hit. I plan to be using marbles as well as steel ammo which is on my B-Day list.


http://www.walmart.c...ot-Kit/16890540

http://www.walmart.c...ngshot/15729969

http://www.walmart.c...ngshot/15111305


Please write which one looks most "durable" as well as the criteria mentioned above!

Edited by sparrowslinger, 20 June 2012 - 06:16 AM.


#2 lloydedwards40

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:30 AM

Killing Sparrows isn't hunting. Perhaps you should wait a few years.
Stick to targets for more reliable and responsible fun.
love'n'joy
Lloyd

#3 Tex-Shooter

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 07:09 AM

There is no good answer to that question. To try to answer it would be an oxymoron statement, but I will try anyway. Power does not rely on slingshot design as much as the bands used and the strength of the shooter. Accuracy does not rely as much on the slingshot as much as the skill of the shooter. Not always the case, most of the time accuracy is not real good with a real powerful slingshot. There is no perfect slingshot for everybody. Some shooters like Cadillac’s and some like Ford’s. Some of the most celebrated shooters have shot tree forks. Take Madison Parker for instance, he as been known to shoot a very strong pulling tree fork slingshot. Then there is Bill Hays that shoots a very sophisticated designed slingshot. One might not be able to hit very well with the other ones slingshot, but both can shoot there own very well. You just have to find out what suits you. I don’t know of any shortcut to doing this. -- Tex


#4 Jakerock

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 07:41 AM

What are some of your favorite sparrow recipes?

#5 ifix

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:22 AM

Killing Sparrows isn't hunting. Perhaps you should wait a few years.
Stick to targets for more reliable and responsible fun.
love'n'joy
Lloyd


it is hunting. not in the UK anymore perhaps but it is in other places.

#6 Jakerock

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 08:52 AM

Well, I guess by dictionary definition it is.

hunting [ˈhʌntɪŋ]
n
(Individual Sports & Recreations / Hunting)
a. the pursuit and killing or capture of game and wild animals, regarded as a sport
b. (as modifier) hunting boots hunting lodge Related adj venatic


I would think that most people who consider themselves hunters would consider the PURPOSEFUL harvest of animals (For food, etc) to be "hunting".

Perhaps a responsible path to killing things would be to do it as skillfully and cause the least amount of suffering possible. Making mistakes and building weapons skills on inanimate objects until a certain level of proficiency is reached seems like a good prescription to me. But this is up to each individual conscience. Peace.

Edited by Jakerock, 20 June 2012 - 09:01 AM.


#7 bkcooler

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 09:13 AM

Here is my 2 cents worth.

I have collected about 50 slingshots of all kinds.
When I started out, I was obsessed with power.
It made me shake from straining and painful hands from band slaps.
Figured out quickly that if you can’t hit it, does not matter how powerful it is.
Worry about power after you get consistency and enjoyment.
One more recommendation, try flat bands.
They are much more efficient.
Only tubes I shoot now days are Tex’s latex and 1745.

#8 treefork

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 10:44 AM

I prefer a natural treefork with flatbands over a Walmart sling.Its a matter of choice. Dive in . Your going to have more than one anyway.Experimenting is part of the fun.

#9 Sofreto

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:11 AM

I agree...no WalMart...there are several vendors and other folks on this forum that make great slings and some are very inexpensive, relatively speaking. Flatland has KFS for $10 USD...send him a message and you will get a nice sling to enjoy and experiment with.

#10 Sofreto

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:13 AM

Sorry, I meant Flatband

#11 jskeen

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:42 AM

Personally, I don't consider killing anything that I'm not planning to eat hunting. That being said, there are plenty of critters that I'm not gonna eat that are better off dead for a multitude of reasons. They may be dangerous to people or other animals that are around them, like poisonous snakes or Hornet nests, I'm not going to go out looking for them to kill, but if they show up in my yard, they are toast. They may be an ecological hazard, like feral cats in Australia or mongoose in Hawaii because they have been introduced into an ecosystem where they have no checks on growth. Feral hogs fall into this category here in Texas, although they are very tasty as well.

European sparrows are an introduced species in North America, and they compete with (much more interesting) native species like bluebirds for habitat, and are actually destructive to bluebird nests and nesting sites. I consider them fair game and will kill them any chance I get, even though I don't eat them. I consider it pest control rather than hunting., however.

So, If you are planning to limit your kills to sparrows, go for it. I doubt that you will rack up a bunch of them, as the little buggers are not easy to sneak up on and hit, but In my book, no harm, no foul.

Randomly wandering about shooting any bird you see however, is a pretty good invitation to having your butt kicked by a fair number of people (including me) if you happen to get caught at it.

And of course, the standard message about it being safer and more humane to practice your skills on targets till you can hit well enough to kill consistently still apply, but I wouldn't sweat it quite as much with sparrows as some other critters.

Ok, I'm ready for the howls of outrage from the PETA crowd now.

#12 pop shot

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 11:58 AM

*updated birthday list

Coping saw
Extra blades
4 in 1 hand rasp
Swiss army knife
Sandpaper in 80, 120, 150 grit
Spray lacquer or polyurethane

Make your own- print up the tex classic, cut it out, pm me and I'll send you a bandset.

#13 sparrowslinger

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:08 PM

Let me explain the power statement. I have tried and failed to build my own natural slingshots, so I have turned to more unnaturally made ones. The ones I made could shoot four feet at maximum. That being said, I am not as strong as other kids my age. I will work on that.

I was planing on doing target practice until I reach a good consistency, then I would go out and do some pest controlling. Sorry for using the wrong word for my practice.

Finally, let me explain the walmart decision. Though I agree that their items aren't nearly as proffesional as some other brands, they are cheap. Whenever my mom knows of me putting a lot of money into a hobby, she goes berzerk. Once I have a decent beginner's slingshot, I will rake up cash and buy another one, maybe more advanced. Though I appreciate all of your how-to videos, I just don't have the skills to make my own decent slingshot, If that would be another option.

#14 Sofreto

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 01:22 PM

"The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step"....SunZhu

#15 Henry in Panama

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 04:31 PM

Of the three slingshots you linked, I think the best for a beginner is the Trumark. It is the simplest and therefore less likely to break or lose parts or have parts work loose. I have a B-52 and consider it to be junk. I don't shoot it, and won't give or sell it to someone else. Don't try to use any of these slingshots with .25 steel balls and whatever ammo you use, wear eye protection.

#16 DaveSteve

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:02 PM

Of the three slingshots you linked, I think the best for a beginner is the Trumark. It is the simplest and therefore less likely to break or lose parts or have parts work loose. I have a B-52 and consider it to be junk. I don't shoot it, and won't give or sell it to someone else. Don't try to use any of these slingshots with .25 steel balls and whatever ammo you use, wear eye protection.

I agree with Henry.
One word on safety too. Check your surroundings before shooting at the sparrow. When the hunting fever kicks in sometimes we forget that a miss or a ricochet can hit something we don't want to hit. It happened to me when I was your age. Your mom would not be proud of you.
So be careful and safe.

#17 sparrowslinger

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 06:43 PM

I will look out for all breakable items!

#18 whipcrackdeadbunny

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:42 AM

Making a natural shooter isn't hard, and I think a good wood would make a better shooter than all the ones shown; otherwise, the Trumark, simple and effective. And listen to Tex, he's been doing this a long time.

#19 Dayhiker

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 05:46 AM

Experiment, I say! Experiment.
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#20 August West

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 06:18 AM

I hate to be a bandwagon jumper but I am fixin to jump. I say spend your money on some high quality tubing or bands find you a nice fork and make your own. It might take a few trys but it will for sure shoot harder, more accurate and probably last longer than the ones you named. I am no fan of wally world bands heavy, hard to pull and slow. Chris




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