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how can you tell if your slingshot is powerful enough to hunt with ?


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24 replies to this topic

#1 jordanrussell123

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:37 AM


i hunt with my slingshot a lot but only head shots. so my question is how can you tell if your slingshot is powerful enough to kill say a crow with a body shoot e.g with air rifles if it will go through a bar of soap then it will go through a rabbit

#2 gamekeeper john

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:39 AM

the best way is to shoot a suspended card, if you cut it in half the ammo will be traveling at 250fps+ but to be honest you shouldn't realy want to kill anything with body shots lol ;)

what bands and ammo are you using - john :)

#3 slingshot_sniper

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:42 AM

There's an easier way GKJ hunter bands and 12mm lead ammo,yeah don't go for body shots ;)

#4 Bill Hays

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 11:47 AM

I've actually tested this out on how many soda cans full of water a single shot must be able to penetrate... 3 cans at 60 feet seems to be the minimum I'd be comfortable with.

#5 bootneck

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:01 PM

I don't really think there could be any universal test, some penatration tests might work if your using light ammo, how about for people like myself who like heavy crushing ammo there be some sort of heavy metal weight to knock over? My heavy ammo goes through half inch plywood easyly but unless you get a direct hit on a beer can it'l just knock it over (my 50 cal lead blasts through cans easy but is harder to get through the plywood but the 16mm lead is harder to get through the cans but easly goes through the plywood) so it would be hard to make a universal test as different objects act differently when there shot.

#6 Toddy

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:41 PM

Lets be honest here shall we? In the real world you might be going for a head shot but we all get wrong from time to time and hit the body. I know my 12mm lead will kill a Rabbit at 20yds with a chest hit. I always aim at the head and won't take the shot if I can't see it properly, but misses happen. The subject of calibre has been argued for years in the Air Rifle world and never been resolved. The ammo you use is personal to a degree, and also needs to be 'balanced' to the bands used.

#7 bootneck

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 01:50 PM

toddy you're spot on there, i really can't add to that

#8 Nico

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:56 PM

Well for whats it worth:

My wire coathhanger slingshot with cheap office #64 chained rubberbands in a simple 333 chain shoots 18 gram 1/2 inch ID hexnuts and 18 gram (277 grain) pebbles at 155 fps and this with an unintentional body shot to the ribs stopped a rabbit.

Do the math 155 fps 18 gram (277 grain) projectile = 14 FPE

I hate numbers but if your going to start talking about blistering speeds then this is the reality of what is possible and there are no universal tests just a sort of guage to give you an idea of "whats possible" impact wise. Besides I rely on blunt force fluid shock trauma not penetration.

I'm not selling anything ( nothing against vending) just giving the truth to help those who want to know..

Nico

#9 jordanrussell123

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Posted 12 October 2011 - 03:47 AM

I don't really think there could be any universal test, some penatration tests might work if your using light ammo, how about for people like myself who like heavy crushing ammo there be some sort of heavy metal weight to knock over? My heavy ammo goes through half inch plywood easyly but unless you get a direct hit on a beer can it'l just knock it over (my 50 cal lead blasts through cans easy but is harder to get through the plywood but the 16mm lead is harder to get through the cans but easly goes through the plywood) so it would be hard to make a universal test as different objects act differently when there shot.

that's a very good point well i use 14 mm or 55 cal so the knock down power with a head shot is just devastating but i don't know about a body shot that's why i made this topic

#10 josephlys

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Posted 13 October 2011 - 03:40 AM

I currently use 8mm ID hex-nuts (8g). I also use medium-light bands 16-18lbs. I almost always go for body shots, rarely do I go for head/neck shots. Eg. killed starlings, doves (.38lead/ hex-nut), a crow (with .44lead) with body shots. But I usually stick within 10yards, so far so good. :)

#11 Tim

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 07:24 AM


I don't really think there could be any universal test, some penatration tests might work if your using light ammo, how about for people like myself who like heavy crushing ammo there be some sort of heavy metal weight to knock over? My heavy ammo goes through half inch plywood easyly but unless you get a direct hit on a beer can it'l just knock it over (my 50 cal lead blasts through cans easy but is harder to get through the plywood but the 16mm lead is harder to get through the cans but easly goes through the plywood) so it would be hard to make a universal test as different objects act differently when there shot.

that's a very good point well i use 14 mm or 55 cal so the knock down power with a head shot is just devastating but i don't know about a body shot that's why i made this topic



#12 Tim

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 07:28 AM

It's all up to the amo you use and what type of bands you have on it. For me personally if it doesn't penetrate something either animal/bird is too big don't hunt it again until you can get a headshot.

#13 ZDP-189

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 08:18 AM

There's a lot of good advice here. From what I have seen, there's a big difference in the killing power of a projectile in the hands of a competent shooter than a less experienced person. I would encourage you to train, then try shooting at realistic ranges and elevations in a wild context, not animal shaped/sized targets but a small aim point the size of a quarter. When you can quickly hit what ever you aim it, then learn animal sign and learn the woods with a mentor as you hunt. The shooting proficiency has to come before the hunt, because otherwise you'll just waste the shot or injure the animal.

The woods where I live are similar to my hunting grounds, which are in a different country. Here I stalk with a camera instead of a slingshot, substituting one passion for another. I don't need the game for the pot, but the challenge and enjoyment of the wilderness is much the same.

#14 hawk2009

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 06:20 AM

To me you have to learn for yourself the best way to despatch game with what ever you choose to shoot with,as an example I started shooting with air rifles as a 14 year old shooting in the back garden at sparrows and starlings, for practice we had a walnut tree at the bottom of the garden I used to shoot those.and daisy heads growing on the lawn, shooting small targets has always been my passion when I got confident with the rifle a bsa meteor .177 and a little older. I started hunting game pheasants and rabbit and had no problem dispatching them, Depending on which way they were facing would depend on where I shot it for example again if it was a rabbit or hare facing me it would be a shot to the chest if it was sideways on it would be the just above the ear and if it was facing away from me the base of the skull. Not all were killed instantly but they certainly were not going anywhere, As for distance most shots were taken between 30 to 50 feet some even closer than that. As for using a slingshot to hunt I would be quite happy to use 9.5mm steel and my favourite four strand tube shooter some will disagree but i'm confident enough with my accuracy to hit what i'm aiming for this has enough power to kill a rabbit or pheasant. It really is down to the confidence of the shooter not the ammo or speed of the bands.

#15 Ry-shot

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 04:17 PM

if it will go through a house its ok !

#16 whipcrackdeadbunny

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 06:46 AM

If it can kill an animal, it's ok.

#17 josephlys

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 07:46 AM

Yeah but how'd ye know it's powerful enough to kill an animal humanely? I'd say experience is the best, then again one can read up on people's experience right here to get a good idea.

#18 ZDP-189

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 07:31 PM

Yeah but how'd ye know it's powerful enough to kill an animal humanely? I'd say experience is the best, then again one can read up on people's experience right here to get a good idea.


There was a young lad called Sam that started exactly this debate and no good answers. If you go by gun tables of minimum accepted calibre for a given game, then no slingshot would be sufficient. Then again, shooters throughout history have proved that a humane kill can be achieved by a hunter of sufficient skill. For me the answer is a combination of skill, projectile mass and kinetic energy.

#19 whipcrackdeadbunny

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 07:01 AM

It was my point, that common sense must prevail; I'd take a lesson from all the successful hunters here.

#20 Ry-shot

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 11:09 AM

If it can kill an animal, it's ok.

lol




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